Gobble – Gobble – Gobble…Thanksgiving Pet Safety Tips

Thanksgiving-and-dog

The holiday season begins with Thanks giving and can be fun for the whole family.

Ovens are working overtime and delicious holiday aromas fill the air, and during this happy time we sometimes tend to become overly generous with our furry friends. This means that often they will “benefit” from table food scraps.  Sometimes, however, too many treats can lead to injury or illness for our pets, and we need to ensure that we keep the “Happy” in Thanksgiving, and avoid a trip to the vet!

NO to Fat: Fatty or rich foods (e.g. beef fat, poultry skin,  gravy, etc.) can cause severe gastrointestinal issues, including:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Excessive gas
  • Pancreatitis[1]

We are better off feeding a few small bites of lean poultry or unsalted/-unbuttered veggies as a treat.

NO to Chocolate: Remember all the chocolaty goodies offered over Thanksgiving (and other holidays).  Chocolate is super dangerous for our furry friends, especially, because it contains theobromine[2]. Dogs are not able to metabolize theobromine as quickly as humans, and the following can occur:

  • Digestive issues
  • Dehydration
  • Excitability
  • Slow heart rate

YES to Green Beans: Plain, cooked green beans are a wonderful treat for our dogs, and fresh veggies are a great addition to their diet. But beware of our famous green bean casserole, because it contains other ingredients that are bad for our pets.

NO to Xylitol: While we may be making a healthier choice by cooking/ baking with artificial sweeteners, they contain Xylitol, which is poisonous to animals, and potentially deadly to dogs.

YES to Cranberry Sauce: Cranberry sauce is just fine for dogs but be cognizant of the amount of sugar and acid in it. It’s probably best to only put a small helping on your dog’s plate.

YES to Mashed Potatoes: Potatoes are a great, filling vegetable to share with our dogs. However, even though potatoes themselves are not harmful to dogs, be aware of other ingredients that may be in our mashed potatoes -cheese, sour cream, butter, onions, and gravies are no-no’s in a dog’s diet.

YES to Turkey: Turkey is a great lean protein to share with our pets. We just need to be sure to remove any excess skin or fat (best to stick with white meat, too) and make sure there are no bones.

YES to Exercise:  Our pet’s meal and exercise schedules are important, and a disruption in their dietary routine can cause stomach upset, diarrhea and/ or vomiting.

NO to Bones:  Make no bones about it. Certain bones can lacerate/ obstruct our pets’ intestines.  So, save the bones for the turkey soup -not your dog.

NO to Onions:  Onions (onion powder, too) are widely found in stuffing and used as a general seasoning.  Those, however, will destroy our dog or cat’s red blood cells, which can lead to anemia.

NO to Grapes and Raisins:  Grapes and raisins contain a toxin that can cause kidney damage to both dogs and cats.

NO to Food Wrappings:  Aluminum foil, wax paper and other food wrappings can cause intestinal obstruction. We have to make sure to place these items securely in the garbage.

NO to Garbage:  Keep an eye on the garbage and keep it securely fastened! If our dogs get into it, they may think “jackpot”, but all they’ll be winning is health problems from something as simple as gastric disturbance, vomiting and diarrhea to the worst-case scenario – death. Yikes!

YES to Fresh Water:  We have to make sure our pets always have fresh water. When there are more people in the house, there are more chances to bump into the water bowl leaving our pets dry and thirsty –not good, especially, when being “spoiled” under the table with stuff they shouldn’t be eating in the first place.

YES to Quiet Time:  We have to make sure our pets have a quiet retreat, because sometimes festivities can be too much for them.  It’s a good idea to observe their behavior to ensure they are not stressed.

So, gobble – gobble – gobble… Have a wonderful Thanksgiving, y’all!

 


[1] Pancreatitis is a severe inflammation of the pancreas, an organ that produces digestive enzymes. On the mild side, pancreatitis can cause vomiting and a decrease in appetite, but can potentially be fatal.

[2] Caffeine-like ingredient that can be toxic to our pets; ater stages of theobromine poisoning include epileptic-like seizures and pet death. Keep your pets away from dark, semi-sweet and baker’s chocolate because they contain higher levels of theobromine.

 

NEW website launched!

NewWebsite

The Jumping Bulldog is pleased to announce the release of its newly designed website!

The website is more engaging with its modern client-centric and eye-catching layout. The site’s homepage welcomes visitors with:

  • a truly “jumping bulldog”,
  • bold colors,
  • a modern design,
  • a section for donations to your favorite pet charities,
  • a section with feature and special sale products,
  • an integrated blog,
  • enhanced shopping capability, and
  • online appointment booking.

You will also experience improved probe search functionality, adding to the user-friendly design.

We look forward to using our blog to provide you with even more information about our latest products and tips and tricks, and on how to have happy and healthy pets.

Keeping in touch with social media, the Jumping Bulldog is embracing Facebook and amortization calculator for mortgage Twitter as a form of communication with our customers. Join the conversation by adding us to your favorite social media network, and to stay ahead on our latest products and pet related information.

The website will be updated on a regular basis, with news of events, product launches and new content.  So, please visit often; and if you experience any problems using the new website or if you have any suggestions, please contact us at info@jumpingbulldog.com.

We hope that you will enjoy browsing our new site, finding more options and information each time, and that it will be yet another way for enhancing your pet’s life.

And don’t forget, you can always book your grooming appointment online!

My Dog and I: Ouch, my feet hurt!

The other day I had an annoying pebble in my shoe I wanted to get rid off.  So, I stepped out of my shoe and put my toes on the pavement –OUCH, the ground was so hot that I actually burnt my toes!

egg-frying-on-sidewalk

Ozzie sat next to me, happily, looking up at me with that loveable, huge grin that is so characteristic for him.  This made me think:  if I burn my toes on the hot pavement, what about his little paws?  I figured I already knew the answer, but I did some research just to be sure.

Here is what I found out:

People think: Dog paws have protective calluses and won’t burn on hot pavement.
Not so: A dog’s paws can and will burn when exposed to extremely hot surfaces such as pavement, sand, concrete, asphalt and so forth.  Test the ground; hold your bare hand or, as in my case foot, on a sidewalk for 5 seconds. If it’s too hot for your skin to handle it is also too hot for your dog’s paws to handle.  In fact, Fido’s pads cannot only burn but blister, too.

People think: Dog paws have protective calluses and won’t burn on hot pavement.
Not so: A dog’s paws can and will burn when exposed to extremely hot surfaces such as pavement, sand, concrete, asphalt and so forth.  Test the ground; hold your bare hand or, as in my case foot, on a sidewalk for 5 seconds. If it’s too hot for your skin to handle it is also too hot for your dog’s paws to handle.  In fact, Fido’s pads cannot only burn but blister, too.

People think: Oh, I have her winter booties; they should protect her from the hot ground when I take her for a walk.
Not so: If you put outright winter boots on your dog’s feet in the summer, chances are that he will sweat even more.  According to Thais Zoe, author of Lucky Duck Living, “dogs have the ability to cool their paws through the in-between of their pads”.  Heat rises from the ground up and gets trapped in the boots.

mainA much better alternative is Pawz boots (because they don’t trap the heat and the dog actually has traction, and, therefore, she can walk properly) or Musher’s Secret, which is a super dense wax that protects paw pads in extreme temperatures –hot or cold.

Musher's-S

I love this stuff, I use it on my arms when they are scratched-up from the rose garden, or from playing with my cats and puppies, I use it on my chapped hands and lips, I use it on Oskar’s nose and pads, and I use it as a general heal-all remedy for minor surface injuries.  Trust me, my husband thinks I’m nuts. But hey, if it works, why not 😉

The point is that it’s easy to misunderstand or overlook our pets’ discomfort.  We need to pay close attention to their body language as well as other signs.  Our French Bulldog, Oskar, always has a huge smile on his face, even when he’s panting like crazy.  So, if you can’t walk your pup in the shade, take preventive steps.

As Dr. Patty Kuhl points out in her PetMD article If You Can’t Stand the Heat … On Burnt Pad Denial in Dogs,  “Your dog would probably follow you to the ends of the earth and never complain.”

Woof, woof & meow!

Images courtesy of: Dietmar Hoepfl, Musher’s Secret.net, Pawz.com

May is National Pet Month!

National-Pet-Month

Since May is national Pet Month, lets all celebrate our Pets! Here are 6 gifts we can give to our pets:

ADD AN ID CHIP.

A microchip is the single best way to ensure that our pets will make their way back to usin case they run off, or get lost.
homeagain-microchips-facts

HEALTHY WEIGHT.

To ensure strong and healthy joints and our pets’ overall longevity, we can make sure we feed them properly, keep table scraps out of their bowl, and create opportunities for exercise.
Penny and Benny blue copy

THE BIG FIX.

Getting our dog or cat spayed or neutered not only reduces the likelihood of unwanted offspring,
but it offers many health benefits, too.
BigFix1

PEST PREVENTION.

It takes year-round vigilance to prevent fleas and worms-our pets’ good health depends on it.
flea-lifecycle

DENTAL CARE.

We can’t let our pets suffer from tooth or gum disease. We can consult with our vet about keeping our pets’
mouth clean and healthy.
pet_dental_health

VACCINATIONS.

We should visit our vet regularly and make sure our cats and dogs are up to date on all of their immunizations.
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Images courtesy of: all-pets-info.com, valleyanimalcoalition.org, catinfo.org, vetcoclinics.com, k9fitclub.com, kewbeachvets.com

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