Dyland & Lenny and The Jumping Bulldog!

Dyland & Lenny and The Jumping Bulldog!

April 27, 2013 we were invited to attend the grand re-opening of the SONY store in Aventura. SONY celebrated this occasion with a HOT, Latin sensation, pop stars Dyland & Lenny…made me kind of weak in the knees. But, I had enough guts to go and get a autograph for my Zoe ☺ …and I can still do the Salsa 😉

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My Dog and I: Mommy, Mommy, My Harness is Pinching Me!

My blog post of April 3rd “Improperly Fitted Harness is Dangerous” has generated a whole bunch of requests for more information, so, I followed the call.

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Anyone out there who loves a soft harness?  Somebody who prefers an H-harness to a traditional harness?  How about a Buddy harness, a Rope-on the Go harness?  Oh, yes, and how about a Halti, or an Easy-Walk harness, or a No-pull harness, or any other specialized harness?

Confused?  I’m not surprised, because there are countless styles of dog harnesses available today, and making the right choice for your particular dog can pose an almost impossible challenge.

Bottom line is this, whatever type of restraint you chose for your dog, buying a harness is not just a matter of personal preference, because even dogs from the same breed come in different sizes, shapes, weight, girth and so forth.  So, go and get help; the best way to fit your dog with a harness is to take him to the store with you!  There, trained staff will assist you in finding the right style and fit, so you won’t pick form over function, or beauty over safety, and still end up with a rockin’ piece of safety gear for Fido.  This may take some time and a few fittings, but any decent retailer will do this for you and your dog.  All staff at The Jumping Bulldog are trained to fit a harness properly, and none of us will let a dog walk out of the store with an ill-fitting restraint because it’s dangerous.

A harness that is not fitted appropriately can cause chafing, bruising, chocking, it can affect a dog’s gait and posture, and a dog can simply slip out and run off.

As for Ozzie, he lives in all kinds of funky step-in harnesses.  They are easy to use and adjust; they provide an even distribution of pressure around the dog’s chest and they are choke-free (no tracheal interference). Equally important is that he feels comfortable in them.  How do I know this?  No, he didn’t tell me.  But I know my dog, and if he is a piece of gear that doesn’t fit right, or feels too stiff, or is itchy, or pinches him somewhere, he will not move –not even for a t-bone steak!  But he loves his step-ins, and when it’s time for a walk I lay his harness on the floor, he steps into it on his own, and trots happily along my side -and that makes a mom happy.

Step-in Harness

 

 

 

 

Those are the facts.

Then there is my husband’s philosophy that says that Oskar’s harnesses should be pre-worn for a proper fit.  Similar to those special people in England who hire someone to walk-in their shoes for six months, or wear their suits before personal use (No, I am not kidding!).  So, my advice is to listen to me, instead of my husband 😉

To learn more check out this great articleDog Harnesses – makes, models and colors explained I found on Squidoo, or write to us at info@jumpingbulldog.com.

Woof, woof & meow

 

Images © The Jumping Bulldog

Doggie PlayCare & Doggie Depot

 

We are touched by your relentless support, as by your consistent request to do this once again.  So, here it is —back by popular demand— Doggie PlayCare has returned to The Jumping Bulldog!

For inquiries just give us a call. All details will be posted here as well as on our website soon!

As always, thank you for your support 🙂

I AM LOOKING FOR A LOVING HOME, PLEASE!!!!

Nina Brown is a 6 month old Blue Nose pit, currently weighing in at a healthy 20lbs. She does not yet have her last booster shot.

Nina is a very sweet and playful little puppy, and she is extremely well socialized and playful. She can already sit, give paw, and lie down on command. Nina’s favorite things are to play and catch bugs, pouncing and looking out the window.

Nina adores babies and lives with another, older dog.

Side note- the current owner let’s her pee on a pee-pad and doesn’t take her outside, so this dog needs some care with social skills.

Won’t you please help us to find her a new, loving home?! While Nina does come from a good environment (free of abuse!!), she is looking for a family that want’s to be with her.

KINDLY spread the word, and if anyone is interested, please inquire @ |718| 274.2510, or jumpingbulldog@ymail.com.

THANK YOU FOR PASSING THIS ON!!!!Blue Nose Baby Pit Needs Home!

New Yorkers, Astorians especially, take their dogs seriously. Obviously, we expect businesses that provide pet care services to take our dogs seriously, too.

Handing our dog over to a dog walker is like entrusting a stranger with our kid, except in some ways it is more dangerous.

Customers always ask my opinion on dog walking services in our neighborhood and I am asked for referrals.  I have spoken to a number of well-known dog walking professionals I work with, and here is a list of things to keep in mind when searching for a pet care professional for your pet for the first time:

  • Dog walking in an unlicensed and unregulated profession.
  • There are no professional standards except your own.
  • You’re giving your keys to a stranger.
  • You’re asking a stranger to navigate an urban environment full of hazards with your most prized possession.

What you can do:

  • Anyone can call him/ herself a dog walker.  Ask friends and family, neighbors or a local vet or pet store, or even a fellow pet owner if they can recommend someone.
  • Ask for, and check references.
  • Make sure your dog walker provides a written service contract spelling out services and fees.
  • Make sure the dog walker can provide written proof that s/he has commercial liability insurance (to cover accidents and negligence).
  • Look for someone who has been in business for several years.
  • Inquire about specific training the dog walker has received to handle emergencies.
  • A good pet care professional is a dedicated individual, and s/he will generally try to accommodate your schedule, even it is difficult at times.
  • Make sure the dog walker records information about your pet, such as likes, dislikes, fears, habits, medical conditions, medications, and routines.  In other words, ask him/ her to establish a pet profile.
  • Make sure the dog walker is associated with a veterinarian who can provide emergency services, if your own vet is too far away.
  • Make sure that you know your dog walker’s back-up person, in case s/he gets sick, has car trouble, or goes on vacation.
  • Make sure you know who walks your dog at all times.  Sometimes dog walkers get too busy because they have taken on too many dogs to handle, and your pooch may be handed off to someone you didn’t even know existed.
  • Make sure your dog walker informs you that your dog has been returned to your home.  A good dog walker will send you text messages and/ or photos of your dog to assure you that your dog is safe.

Again, these are just the basics when choosing a dog walker.  To find out more please read this helpful piece from Inger Martens.  http://www.pawsforaminute.com/tag/how-to-find-a-good-dog-walker/

“Remember if you are happy with your dog walker the best way to show your appreciation is to recommend them to your friends, family, vet, pet store, and others you know who have pets or deal with the local pet care industry!”

woof, woof & meow!

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