Spring Safety Tips for Pets

Woo-Wee-Woo, it’s spring time!!!

Woo Hoo, it's spring!

For our humans this is the time for spring-cleaning and BBQs, and for us canines this means O.U.T.D.O.O.R. time!!!  We get to play outside, sniff all the other doggie butts at the dog park, go on walks with our owners, play fetch, run, chase squirrels … oh, my, the list is long!

Yes, yes, yes, we’re super excited.  But it’s also super important that our parents’ take a number of precautions to make sure we’re happy and healthy this spring.

Check out these tips on how we can keep our best friends safe, healthy, happy and most importantly, keep their tails waggin’ with joy!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hello, my name is…

It’s a great idea to equip me with proper identification before letting me run under the open sky.

I might be so excited to run around that I may end up chasing a squirrel or bunny, and suddenly run away from you or lose my way.  Just place a visible ID tag on my collar with your information.  This way, you can be sure that your squirrel-happy pup will be returned home.  Trust me, I don’t like to be away from my humans; I don’t like it one bit!

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Fleas and ticks and critters… oh my!

My humans use flea and tick prevention for me year-round.  But it is especially important to use prevention during spring and summer when those creepy crawlers are particularly active, because those nasty critters can cause Lyme disease in dogs.  And let’s face it; flea infestations are no fun for anyone.  So, just tell your human that it’s best to prevent fleas and ticks before they happen.  Our parents can also help us by flea-combing our coats regularly, and by vacuuming frequently and disposing of the bags immediately after use.  And if you are lucky to have a grassy yard, tell your parent to please mow the lawn.

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Too cool for school…

Temperatures will be rising soon and humans have got to keep us cool. When we are outside on hot days, our temperatures rise higher than that of our parents because they don’t have a furry coat, an under-coat or fluffy hair.  So, it’s best they take us out for a walk or a run in the park when the sun is setting.  And if we are on a play date, they should make sure that there is always a shady retreat and plenty of water available.  Cuz’, slurp, we get thirsty, too.

You know we need water, if we are panting and have our tongues hanging out; that’s doggie code for “I’m thirsty, dude”.  And N.E.V.E.R., E.V.E.R., leave us in the car. You know some of us just love to go on rides with our humans, but only when they’re in the car with us. Even on a 60-degree day, temperatures can rise to 100 degrees inside a car.  Believe you me, it’s like a sauna, and it’s very stressful on us furballs.  When you realize that we are worn out and hot after chasing our best friends, please bring us inside and place a cool towel over the top of our neck, it does help.  Even better yet, just put a cooling bandana around our neck before you take us places.  That will help a lot, too.

pop

You remember those cheapo popsicles from the supermarket?  Tell your parents to buy them and suck them to cool themselves off.  Then, ask them to wash them out, fill them with our favorite doggie-safe broth (juice) and freeze them, and voilà, we have a pup-sicle 🙂

 

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Born to run…

If Fido has been a couch potato all winter, then it’s a good idea to get her back into outdoor activity gradually. Just like our humans, exercising and building up muscles slowly will help prevent injuries. Before we can go running with you, you have to make sure that we can at least walk 30 to 60 minutes alongside your stride without getting tired.  Tell mom and dad to consider your individual personality and fitness level. If you are pleasantly plump, have joint problems or are on your way to becoming a senior, it won’t hurt to get a quick warm up.  My humans let me sniff and waddle at my own pace for about 10 minutes before they get me to strut my stuff.

Your humans can play fetch with you for a few minutes to get some of that emerging energy out by throwing the ball or Frisbee and letting you sprint after it.  But tell them to only do this for a few minutes so they don’t wear you out completely.

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Scratch n’ sniff…

When it comes to allergies, dogs tend to have similar allergy symptoms as their humans. Fore example, grass and tree pollen may cause a dog to sneeze and have watery eyes- just like humans.

And a pup may develop itchy paws, too, which can cause us to lick, nibble and bite on them. This constant scratching, of course, may lead to open sores, raised welts and loss of hair.  So, tell your parents to do what they can to reduce the amount of allergens in the house by vacuuming carpets and sweeping floors often.  And they should pay special attention to your favorite spots in the house such as under beds, on the couch or near windows, maybe, and tell them to clean (vacuum or wash) window treatments regularly.  And lets not forget our bedding, which needs to be washed regularly using a gentle detergent that is free of dyes or perfumes.  It may also help for your humans to limit your outdoor time and activities during allergy season.  They can take you out or let you go potty when it’s less windy, or before they mow the lawn.

Now, there it is, my fine, furry friends.  With a little bit of effort and preparation your humans can almost guarantee you a happy, healthy and playful spring.

Happy sneezin’!

Ozzie

 

 

finasteride generic My Dog and I: Mommy, Mommy, My Harness is Pinching Me!

My blog post of April 3rd “Improperly Fitted Harness is Dangerous” has generated a whole bunch of requests for more information, so, I followed the call.

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Anyone out there who loves a soft harness?  Somebody who prefers an H-harness to a traditional harness?  How about a Buddy harness, a Rope-on the Go harness?  Oh, yes, and how about a Halti, or an Easy-Walk harness, or a No-pull harness, or any other specialized harness?

Confused?  I’m not surprised, because there are countless styles of dog harnesses available today, and making the right choice for your particular dog can pose an almost impossible challenge.

Bottom line is this, whatever type of restraint you chose for your dog, buying a harness is not just a matter of personal preference, because even dogs from the same breed come in different sizes, shapes, weight, girth and so forth.  So, go and get help; the best way to fit your dog with a harness is to take him to the store with you!  There, trained staff will assist you in finding the right style and fit, so you won’t pick form over function, or beauty over safety, and still end up with a rockin’ piece of safety gear for Fido.  This may take some time and a few fittings, but any decent retailer will do this for you and your dog.  All staff at The Jumping Bulldog are trained to fit a harness properly, and none of us will let a dog walk out of the store with an ill-fitting restraint because it’s dangerous.

A harness that is not fitted appropriately can cause chafing, bruising, chocking, it can affect a dog’s gait and posture, and a dog can simply slip out and run off.

As for Ozzie, he lives in all kinds of funky step-in harnesses.  They are easy to use and adjust; they provide an even distribution of pressure around the dog’s chest and they are choke-free (no tracheal interference). Equally important is that he feels comfortable in them.  How do I know this?  No, he didn’t tell me.  But I know my dog, and if he is a piece of gear that doesn’t fit right, or feels too stiff, or is itchy, or pinches him somewhere, he will not move –not even for a t-bone steak!  But he loves his step-ins, and when it’s time for a walk I lay his harness on the floor, he steps into it on his own, and trots happily along my side -and that makes a mom happy.

Step-in Harness

 

 

 

 

Those are the facts.

Then there is my husband’s philosophy that says that Oskar’s harnesses should be pre-worn for a proper fit.  Similar to those special people in England who hire someone to walk-in their shoes for six months, or wear their suits before personal use (No, I am not kidding!).  So, my advice is to listen to me, instead of my husband 😉

To learn more check out this great articleDog Harnesses – makes, models and colors explained I found on Squidoo, or write to us at info@jumpingbulldog.com.

Woof, woof & meow

 

Images © The Jumping Bulldog